Getting the most out of exposure therapy

I sat quietly while the client in front of me closed her eyes and recounted in vivid detail the sexual assault she had experienced many years before. The pain of the memory was evident on her face and in her voice. The details were shocking and sad, yet I felt truly honored to bear witness…

Exploring the final frontier: multicultural competence

This post is part of a series for practicing mental health professionals. When I was in graduate school, I had the privilege of attending a lecture given by psychologist Joseph White, who is sometimes referred to as the “Godfather of Black Psychology.” He took me and my classmates on a tour of the psychological movements…

Best practices in risk assessment and safety planning

This post is part of a series for practicing metal health professionals. As a mental health professional, you know that psychological crises vary widely in form and gravity. Whether a client is dealing with suicidal thoughts or plans to harm someone else, you play a major role in helping them receive appropriate support to cope…

Battling burnout with purpose and meaning

When my kids were toddlers, my husband and I had a complex division of labor. We both worked full-time and, as is often the case for working parents of little ones, there was always way more that needed to be done than we had time for. It felt like we were constantly in motion trying…

Integrating self-compassion into your practice

Right now, the science of mindfulness, as well as acceptance and compassion-focused therapies, are growing at warp speed. Clinicians are steadily presented with new treatment options for anxiety and depression that are grounded in centuries of meditation tradition and tested and honed by advanced research. It’s understandable that this rapid emergence of new methods and techniques can seem a little daunting. After years of education and many more years of practical experience, do we really want to roll up our sleeves and learn a whole new mode of therapy? Thankfully, we don’t need to begin again from scratch when we wish to work with innovations in mindfulness and self-compassion.

New funding, same mission to transform mental health.

Today we are pleased to announce that we’ve raised $45 million in new financing, which we will use to accelerate development of new tools and expand our team. This funding further validates the need for innovative mental health software and we’ll continue to show how software, data, and a human touch can be blended to make it easier for people to learn new skills, change thoughts and behaviors, and live happier and more fulfilling lives.

Meet the new Lyra: New look, same commitment to care

Starting today, Lyra has a brand new look, one that we feel reflects our values, who we are, and how far we’ve come since first launching in January 2016. When we set out to redesign the Lyra brand, we wanted to make it feel just like us – modern and hi-tech, but also calming and supportive. We also strived to create something that our diverse audiences – members, providers, and employers – could relate to. Not an easy task, but we are really proud of what we’ve created.

Does practice make perfect? On music and mental health

Sometimes we think of psychological difficulties like anxiety, or depression, or anger, more like traits, or something inside us – and that living well means getting rid of this flawed broken piece of us. But what if we approached psychological well-being as something that we can work towards, one small act at a time, over a period of time, across different situations, with different people? What if we practiced well-being?

The wisdom and benefit of clinical consultation

I find having an experienced clinician pay close attention to my therapeutic work liberating. That’s why I’m a strong advocate for supervisory consultation. However, I’ve observed that once licensed, many clinicians find themselves so busy that supervision gets left behind. Granted, making time for supervision in an already full schedule is challenging, but participating in supervision and consultation practice is vital if we are to give clients the best of what we have to offer.

Gently challenging your thinking traps

It turns out there is a stepwise method for addressing thinking traps that gives us a little freedom from their tyranny. It’s called reappraisal. Reappraisal means slowing down, looking at what’s going on in your mind, and evaluating your thoughts. It’s especially helpful when you’re having a strong emotional response. It’s a skill you can easily learn, and though it seems pretty basic, following the steps can help reduce the intensity of a painful emotion and lead to more effective actions.